How to get enough Vitamins

How to get enough vitamins

 

The best way to get your vitamins is through the food you eat and if you are eating a healthy and varied diet, you probably are getting all the vitamins your body needs. Talk your diet over with your personal trainer and maybe make a few tweaks here and there to make it even healthier.

Vitamin A which is essential for growth and cell development, vision and immune function, healthy skin and hair and protects against infections and disease as it is a powerful antioxidant. Make sure your diet includes some of these

  • Raw carrots
  • Liver
  • Oily fish
  • Egg yolk
  • Fortified milk and dairy products – cheese, butter, yoghurt, cream
  • Broccoli
  • Dark green leafy vegetables
  • Sweet red peppers
  • Pumpkins
  • Mangoes
  • Cantaloupe melons
  • Apricots

Vitamin D essential for healthy bones is manufactured mainly by the skin when it’s exposed to sunlight. Other good sources include

  • Fish (fatty fish such as salmon, mackerel, sardines, herring, and tuna)
  • Fish liver oils (cod liver oil)
  • Fortified cereals
  • Fortified milk and dairy products (cheese, yogurt, butter, and cream)

Vitamin E is an antioxidant needed for healthy skin, a good strong immune system and a healthy heart, so make sure you include some of the following in your diet

  • Avocado
  • Dark green vegetables (spinach, broccoli, asparagus, and turnip greens)
  • Oils (safflower, corn, and sunflower)
  • Tuna and salmon
  • Broccoli
  • Wholegrains including oats, rye and brown rice
  • Papaya and mango
  • Sunflower seeds and nuts, almonds are good
  • Wheat germ and wheat germ oil

Vitamin K which is great for building and maintaining healthy, strong bones and essential for helping blood to clot properly can be got from eating these

  • Egg yolk
  • Fish oils
  • Dairy produce
  • Yoghurt
  • Green leafy vegetables – kale, spinach, collards, Swiss chard, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower,
  • asparagus, parsley
  • Avocado, kiwi, grapes
  • Cereals

Thiamine (Vitamin B1) is needed for energy production, carbohydrate digestion, a healthy nervous system and heart function can be sourced in

  • Egg
  • Enriched bread and flour
  • Lean meats
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Liver
  • Peas
  • Whole grains, rye, oats, millet, quinoa

Niacin (Vitamin B3) among other things is good for hormone synthesis, such as insulin the hormone that regulates blood sugar levels in the body and also for thyroxine, serotonin and other mood and brain hormones. It is found in foods that are high in protein and includes

  • Avocado
  • Eggs
  • Enriched breads and fortified cereals
  • Fish (tuna and salt-water fish)
  • Lean meats and poultry
  • Legumes
  • Nuts

Pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5) is needed for conversion of fats and carbohydrates into energy and the best sources are

  • Avocado
  • Broccoli, kale, and other vegetables in the cabbage family
  • Egg yolks
  • Legumes and lentils
  • Milk
  • Mushroom
  • Fish
  • Liver
  • Chicken
  • White and sweet potatoes
  • Whole-grain cereals rye, millet, barley

Pyroxidine (Vitamin B6) is involved in more bodily processes than any other vitamin, one being it helps form haemoglobin – the substance in red blood cells that carries oxygen around the body and maintain brain function. This found in the following

  • Avocado
  • Banana
  • Cabbage
  • Leeks
  • Lean red meat
  • Egg yolks
  • Dairy produce
  • Chickpeas
  • Oily fish
  • Nuts
  • Poultry
  • Wheat germ

Biotin (Vitamin B7) also know as Vitamin H, is needed for healthy hair, nails, skin and energy production and is best found in

  • Brewer’s yeast
  • Liver
  • Soy products
  • Brown rice
  • Cereal
  • Egg yolk
  • Milk
  • Nuts

Folic acid (Vitamin B9) is most famous for its role in helping to prevent neural defects during pregnancy but it is also good for the immune system, energy production and in preventing anaemia. This can be found in

  • Asparagus, broccoli, sprouts, carrots, kale, spinach
  • Beets
  • Brewer’s yeast
  • Dried beans (cooked pinto, navy, kidney, and lima)
  • Fortified cereals
  • Wholewheat and rye
  • Lentils
  • Oranges and orange juice, apricots
  • Pumpkins, squashes and melons
  • Peanut butter
  • Wheat germ

Vitamin B12 is needed for growth, the digestive and nervous system, as well as the production of energy and healthy blood cells. It is also worth noting that after the age of 50, the ability to absorb vitamin B12 from food declines and animal sources of this vitamin are better absorbed by the body than that from plant sources. So source your vitamin from

  • Meat
  • Eggs
  • Fortified cereals
  • Fortified foods such as soy-milk
  • Vegetarian can also consider seaweed and spirulina
  • Milk and milk products
  • Liver and kidney)
  • Poultry
  • Shellfish

Vitamin C (Ascorbic acid) is required for a strong immune system, a healthy heart, good skin and gums, and helping to preventing diseases like heart disease and cancer and helping wounds to heal properly.

  • Broccoli
  • Brussel sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Spinach
  • Pumpkins
  • Sweet peppers
  • Strawberries, pomegranates, citrus fruits, kiwi, peaches
  • Tomato juice
  • Tomatoes